• Having a Baby at MHP was all about Family for the Bellingers
    Having a Baby at MHP was all about Family for the Bellingers

    Bryon and Christy Bellinger are the proud parents of 11-year-old Terryk, and recently welcomed George Ivan, born July 6, 2016. They wouldn’t have dreamed o…

    Continue Reading
  • Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet
    Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet

    D is for Determination! Without it, Dean Strawn and his wife, Jane, along with his Physical Therapists at MHP, say he wouldn’t be walking, talking and m…

    Continue Reading
  • After Hysterectomy, Tami O'Day Back to Work in 11 Days
    After Hysterectomy, Tami O'Day Back to Work in 11 Days

    With a household of eight to care for and a fulltime job, the last thing Tami O’Day of Oskaloosa was making time for was herself. Tami thought her m…

    Continue Reading
  • Larry Spoelstra Gets to the Bottom of Health Concerns with Collaborative Care at MHP
    Larry Spoelstra Gets to the Bottom of Health Concerns with Collaborative Care at MHP

    When it comes to healthcare, being able to continue working without interruption is a common concern for many, Larry Spoelstra is no different. “I’ve liv…

    Continue Reading
  • Janean Wedeking’s Family Gets a Little Bigger with MHP
    Janean Wedeking’s Family Gets a Little Bigger with MHP

    Janean and Derek Wedeking know the value of family, both personally and professionally. Janean is a fourth year medical student who has been on rotations…

    Continue Reading

Provider Focus

FowlerHeadshotJeffrey Fowler, DO

Dr. Jeffrey Fowler is an OB/GYN at MHP who specializes in the obstetrical and gynecological care for women through every stage of life.

Read More


Walk-In Open 7 Days a Week

WalkInHomePage

Latest News & Events

22 September 2016
You’ve heard of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but what about prediabetes? When your blood sugar levels are high but not quite high enough to qualify as type 2 diabetes, you may be diagnosed with prediabetes. So what in the world does that mean? Well, according to MHP Registered Dietitian Lea Rice, it’s not a sentence for type 2 diabetes! In fact, this diagnosis is a great opportunity to look at your health and make adjustments before developing dia...
15 September 2016
Did you know that nearly 75% of all colon cancers can be prevented with healthy lifestyle choices? MHP General Surgeon Paul Riggs, MD, FACS, does know, which is why he is such an advocate for healthy colon habits! Screenings are an important tool in monitoring the health of your colon but there is a lot you can do between screenings to help this important organ do its best work! Your colon is responsible for helping you digest food and get valuab...

Plantar Fascititis

Plantar fascititis is common foot problem

Podiatrist Mark Beers, DPM, said one of the most common orthopaedic complaints related to the foot is called plantar fascititis or heel pain.

“Plantar fascititis causes stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning,” Dr. Beers, who has been a practicing podiatrist in Oskaloosa for 20 years, explained.  “It often takes a while for your foot to limber up and the pain to decrease, and pain often returns after extended walking or long periods of standing.”

Dr. Beers said plantar fascititis involves inflammation of a thick band of tissue, called the plantar fascia, which runs across the bottom of the foot and connects the heal bone to the toes. The plantar fascia works like a rubber band between the heel and the ball of the foot to form the arch of the foot. 

“If the band is short, you'll have a high arch, and if it's long, you'll have a low arch or what is often called flat feet,” Dr. Beers explained.  “A pad of fat in your heel covers the plantar fascia to help absorb the shock of walking.”

As a person hits middle age or as stress is put on the feet, the plantar fascia often loses its elasticity. The fat pad on the heel becomes thinner and can't absorb shock as well as it once did. The extra shock damages the plantar fascia and may cause it to swell, tear or bruise.

“Besides age, other risk factors include foot arch problems (both flat foot and high arches), obesity, sudden weight gain or occupations that require a person to stand on his or her feet most of the work day.  Plantar fascititis may also be caused by certain types of exercise, such as long-distance running or ballet dancing, or can be caused by improper shoes that lack arch support.”

Dr. Beers, who is on the medical staff at Mahaska Health Partnership and performs foot surgeries there, said more than 90 percent of patients with plantar fasciitis don’t require surgical intervention. “Initially, plantar fascititis treatment usually consists of anti-inflammatory medications, heel stretching exercises, night splints and/or shoe inserts.”

If these treatments fail, Dr. Beers said a cast boot for three to six weeks is very often successful in reducing pain and swelling. Steroid injections often can also help.  In a few patients, non-surgical treatment fails and surgery to release the inflamed fascia becomes necessary.

“Most patients who start non-surgical therapy will improve within a year with no long-term problems,” Dr. Beers stressed. “In the few patients who do require surgery, most have relief of their heel pain afterwards.”

Dr. Beers recommends the following tips for people with heel pain:

  • Arch support. Wear shoes or custom orthotics designed to support arches.
  • Rest. Decrease or even stop the activities that make the pain worse.
  • Ice. Roll your foot over a cold water bottle or ice for 20 minutes.
  • Consult a Podiatrist. If you have symptoms of plantar fascititis, the most effective way to prevent further damage and get relief is to consult with a trained specialist in foot health.

For more information on plantar fascititis or other foot problems, contact Dr. Beers at Oskaloosa Foot Clinic, 673-3289.