• Persistence Pays off When it Comes to Jane Humble's Health
    Persistence Pays off When it Comes to Jane Humble's Health

    Jane Humble of Fremont has rarely been sick, so when she came down with a bug that kept her in bed for a month, her family knew it was serious. “I went t…

    Continue Reading
  • Making the Switch to MHP was Perfect Choice For Stice Family
    Making the Switch to MHP was Perfect Choice For Stice Family

    When Sarah and John Stice of Ottumwa found out they were pregnant with their first child, the obvious choice for obstetrical care was local. “We originally b…

    Continue Reading
  • BJ Bowie Appreciated Faster Recovery Time After Robotic Hernia Repair
    BJ Bowie Appreciated Faster Recovery Time After Robotic Hernia Repair

    When BJ Bowie needed a hernia repaired, there was no question where he wanted to go for care. He didn’t realize the surgery could be done robotically; h…

    Continue Reading
  • Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet
    Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet

    D is for Determination! Without it, Dean Strawn and his wife, Jane, along with his Physical Therapists at MHP, say he wouldn’t be walking, talking and m…

    Continue Reading
  • Larry Spoelstra Gets to the Bottom of Health Concerns with Collaborative Care at MHP
    Larry Spoelstra Gets to the Bottom of Health Concerns with Collaborative Care at MHP

    When it comes to healthcare, being able to continue working without interruption is a common concern for many, Larry Spoelstra is no different. “I’ve liv…

    Continue Reading

Provider Focus

JohannesHD2016SmallTonya Johannes, ARNP-BC

Tonya Johannes, ARNP-BC, is a Family Nurse Practitioner at MHP who treats patients of all ages and has a special interest in skin care. 

Read More


Take the Community Health Needs Assessment

WebHomepageImageNov2016

Latest News & Events

08 December 2016
When it comes to your diet, you’re always looking for the best way to squeeze in those good for you items, right? We all want to be healthy and mindful of what we put into our bodies, but sometimes there are nutritional gaps due to our body’s inability to absorb certain nutrients or a personal disdain for vegetables on the dinner table.Whatever your reasons, it may be time for a check-up in the nutritional department. Family Practice Physician Va...
01 December 2016
Whether you’re a woman in need of her yearly mammogram or bringing your child in for an X-ray of a possible broken bone, radiation can be a concern. Do you know what radiation really is?MHP Director of Radiology does! In fact, her entire department would be lost without it! Radiation is used in various medical imaging tests to help determine the best treatment option for patients without extreme measures such as exploratory surgery. The ionizing ...

Caution against High Cholesterol

Caution against High Cholesterol

In recognition of February as American Heart Month, Mahaska Health Partnership encourages you to know your cholesterol.

“Too much cholesterol in the blood can lead to heart disease and stroke,” MHP Registered Dietitian Lea Rice said. “Half of American adults have cholesterol levels that are too high.”

The danger associated with high cholesterol is when you have too much LDL (low density lipoprotein). “The LDL is often called the bad cholesterol,” Rice explained. “When you have too much, it can join with fats and other substances to build up in the inner wall of your arteries. The arteries can become clogged and narrow, reducing blood flow.”

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), if a blood clot forms and blocks an artery, a heart attack can occur. If a blood clot blocks an artery leading to the brain, a stroke results. Rice stressed there are many lifestyle changes you can make to reduce bad cholesterol. “Limiting foods high in fat can significantly reduce a person’s chances of developing too much LDL.”

Foods to limit include whole milk, cream and ice cream; butter, egg yolk, cheese and foods made with them; organ meats such as liver, sweetbreads, kidney and brains; high-fat processed meats such as sausage, bologna, salami and hot dogs. Rice said there are different kinds of fats in the food we eat and each has a different affect on cholesterol.

  • Saturated fat – Raises blood cholesterol and LDL levels. Avoid animal fats such as lard and meat fat. In addition, avoid some plant fats such as coconut, palm oil and palm kernel oil.
  • Trans fat – Raises blood cholesterol and is used in commercial baked goods and for cooking in some restaurants and fast-food chains.
  • Polyunsaturated fats – Tend to lower blood cholesterol when consumed in moderation and used to replace saturated and trans fat, however, may also lower HDL (good cholesterol). These are found in vegetable and fish oils.
  • Monounsaturated fats – Tend to lower blood cholesterol as part of a low-saturated fat diet and do not decrease HDL (good cholesterol). These are found in olive, canola, peanut, sun flower and safflower oils.

There are still a lot of delicious food choices for a person trying to maintain a low-fat diet to reduce cholesterol,” Rice said. “Some low-fat food recommendations include: eating a variety of fruits and vegetables; grain products such as bread, cereal, rice and pasta; fat-free and low-fat milk products; lean meats and poultry without skin; beans and peas; and nuts and seeds in limited amounts.”

Rice mentioned another way to reduce fat in your diet is to change the way food is cooked. The AHA recommends draining off fat by using a rack to broil or bake; using wine, fruit juice or marinade instead of basting with drippings; and broiling or grilling instead of pan-frying.

The AHA also suggests cutting off visible fat from meat before cooking and removing the skin from poultry; using a vegetable spray to brown or sauté foods; serving smaller portions of high-fat foods and larger portions of lower-fat dishes; making recipes or egg dishes with egg whites or substitute; and using low-fat cheese in place of regular cheese.

“Having your cholesterol checked is the first step in maintaining a healthy LDL,” Rice said. MHP will be offering community cholesterol screenings on Tuesday, Feb. 15 and Wednesday, Feb. 16 from 6:30 to 9 a.m. on their campus in Oskaloosa. For an appointment, call 641-672-3100.