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    Bryon and Christy Bellinger are the proud parents of 11-year-old Terryk, and recently welcomed George Ivan, born July 6, 2016. They wouldn’t have dreamed o…

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  • Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet
    Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet

    D is for Determination! Without it, Dean Strawn and his wife, Jane, along with his Physical Therapists at MHP, say he wouldn’t be walking, talking and m…

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  • After Hysterectomy, Tami O'Day Back to Work in 11 Days
    After Hysterectomy, Tami O'Day Back to Work in 11 Days

    With a household of eight to care for and a fulltime job, the last thing Tami O’Day of Oskaloosa was making time for was herself. Tami thought her m…

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  • Larry Spoelstra Gets to the Bottom of Health Concerns with Collaborative Care at MHP
    Larry Spoelstra Gets to the Bottom of Health Concerns with Collaborative Care at MHP

    When it comes to healthcare, being able to continue working without interruption is a common concern for many, Larry Spoelstra is no different. “I’ve liv…

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  • Janean Wedeking’s Family Gets a Little Bigger with MHP
    Janean Wedeking’s Family Gets a Little Bigger with MHP

    Janean and Derek Wedeking know the value of family, both personally and professionally. Janean is a fourth year medical student who has been on rotations…

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Provider Focus

FowlerHeadshotJeffrey Fowler, DO

Dr. Jeffrey Fowler is an OB/GYN at MHP who specializes in the obstetrical and gynecological care for women through every stage of life.

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Latest News & Events

22 September 2016
You’ve heard of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but what about prediabetes? When your blood sugar levels are high but not quite high enough to qualify as type 2 diabetes, you may be diagnosed with prediabetes. So what in the world does that mean? Well, according to MHP Registered Dietitian Lea Rice, it’s not a sentence for type 2 diabetes! In fact, this diagnosis is a great opportunity to look at your health and make adjustments before developing dia...
15 September 2016
Did you know that nearly 75% of all colon cancers can be prevented with healthy lifestyle choices? MHP General Surgeon Paul Riggs, MD, FACS, does know, which is why he is such an advocate for healthy colon habits! Screenings are an important tool in monitoring the health of your colon but there is a lot you can do between screenings to help this important organ do its best work! Your colon is responsible for helping you digest food and get valuab...

Late Sleeping and Weight Gain

Mahaska Health Partnership Sleep Services urges the public to maintain good sleep habits.

“Adequate sleep is as important as good nutrition and exercise to your health,” MHP Sleep Technologist Kai Schwab said. “A recently study showed that people who stay up late and sleep in end up consuming more calories in a day and are at risk for gaining weight.”

The study, conducted by researchers of the Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Program at Feinberg and Northwestern Memorial Hospital, showed that late sleepers consume 248 more calories in a day, twice as much fast food and half as many fruits and vegetables as those with earlier sleep times. Late sleepers also consumed more full-calorie beverages. The study concluded that the extra calories were consumed during dinner and later in the evening with others were asleep.

‘The extra daily calories can mean a significant amount of weight gain, two pounds per month, if they are not balanced by more physical activity,” said co-lead author and health psychologist Kelly Glazor Baron. “We don’t know if late sleepers consume the extra calories because they prefer more high-calorie foods or because there are less healthy options available late at night.”

Schwab stressed that continuous weight gain can lead to other, more serious health complications such as sleep apnea. “People who are overweight or those with a large neck circumference are more susceptible to developing sleep apnea, a closing of the airway during sleep.”

According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, obstructive sleep apnea causes pauses in breathing that last between 10 and 30 seconds, but some may persist for one minute or longer. The lack of oxygen can lead to abrupt reductions in blood oxygen saturation.

Schwab explained that most people with sleep apnea snore loudly and frequently with periods of silence when airflow is blocked. Those suffering with the condition may also experience excessive day time sleepiness and possibly depression due to the lack of quality sleep.

“Maintaining a good sleep routine affects many aspects of a person’s overall health and well-being. If you are having trouble sleeping, contact your primary care provider.”

To find more about how MHP Sleep Services is making healthcare personal, visit mahaskahealth.org.