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Provider Focus

JenScott2016Jen Scott, ARNP-C

Family Nurse Practitioner Jen Scott, ARNP-C, treats patients of all ages and has a special interest in cardiac care. 

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Latest News

Oh my Heart!

With a new little one, the tests, forms and information are abundant. Family Practice with Obstetrics Physician Dr. Shawn Richmond knows this all too well! One test that all of his little patients receive is a pulse oximetry to measure the amount of oxygen in the blood. Sounds big but it’s actually quite small. The test uses little sticky monitors (think of a band-aid), that are applied to a baby’s foot and hand. Don’t worry, this test is totally painless, but provides insight on their health, often before any signs and symptoms could be noticed. Pretty neat huh?

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Published Feb 23, 2017

Shake Those Hips!

When it comes to your body, aches and pains can really throw you for a loop! One common complaint is hip, knee and shoulder pain, at least in MHP Orthopaedic Surgeon Sreedhar Somisetty, MD’s, office! Some may think replacing those joints will fix all; however, Dr. Somisetty likes to remind patients that it’s not a race to the finish line and taking baby steps will get you on the road to recovery!

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Published Feb 16, 2017

Harmful Drug Interactions

MHP Warns about Harmful Drug Interactions

As part of National Drug Facts week, Mahaska Health Partnership cautions seniors about hazardous drug interactions.

 

MHP Pharmacist John Agan said, “it’s important for all people to be familiar with the medicines they are taking. “As a person gets older, they are often prescribed numerous medications by multiple doctors for various conditions,” Agan explained. “If a patient does not disclose medications they are taking, they might be given something that could produce a negative drug interaction.”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) suggests creating a detailed list of all medication you are taking including prescription, over- the- counter, supplements and herbal. The list should include the name of the medicine, the doctor who prescribed it, how much and how often to take, instructions on how to take it, what it is taken for and the expected side effects.

Agan said an important thing patients can do to help their doctors is to keep a side effects log. “When you’re prescribed a new medicine, keep track of how it makes you feel and whether it had the desired outcome. From the log, your doctor may adjust your dose or try something different. Not all medicines work the same for all people.”

According to the FDA, body changes can affect how fast medicines enter the blood stream. “Changes in body mass can influence the amount of medicine you need and how long it stays in your body,” Agan explained.

The FDA also suggests utilizing your pharmacist as a resource. They said a pharmacist can explain your medications, how and when to take it and what interactions may occur. “I always recommend patients use one pharmacy. That way, the pharmacist will have a list of all of your prescribed medications. When you are prescribed something new, you can ask the pharmacist to review your profile to check for possible interactions,” Agan stressed.

Taking medicine as prescribed is very important to a person’s overall health, however; if the doctor prescribes it without a complete medicine history, it may not produce the intended results. To find out more about how Mahaska Health Partnership is making healthcare personal, visit mahaskahealth.org.