Provider Focus

HornerStanley Horner, DO

Dr. Stanley Horner is an Allergy/Immunology Specialist who recently joined the MHP Medical Group. 

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Latest News

Bacteria Can Also Be Good for You?!

When you think of bacteria, you think of getting sick, right? Well, believe it or not, there are actually lots of bacteria both inside our bodies and out in the world that are good for us. Crazy right? These are called probiotics, pro-good, get it?

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Published Apr 20, 2017

Ten Ways for Women to Keep their Health In Check

As a wife, mom or otherwise caretaker, it’s easy to put your health on the backburner while you worry about everyone else. “Schedule that mammogram? I’ll do it tomorrow. When was the last time I got my blood sugar checked? I’m sure it’s normal, I feel fine!”

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Published Apr 13, 2017

MHP Urges Fireworks Safety

MHP Urges Fireworks Safety

July is Fireworks Safety Month and Mahaska Health Partnership urges the public to celebrate Independence Day by leaving the lightshow to professionals.

“Each year, around 6,000 Americans spend their 4th of July in emergency rooms due to firework-related injuries,” MHP Emergency Services Chief Medical Officer Matt Whitis, MD, explained. “Most fire-work related injuries occur during the one-month period around Independence Day.”

It is illegal to sell, use or explode fireworks in the state of Iowa. Fireworks include firecrackers, torpedoes, skyrockets and roman candles. However, fireworks can be displayed if an individual, organization or association is granted a permit. Certain “novelty items” and sparklers are permitted.

 “Sparklers with wire or wooden sticks are allowed in Iowa, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get hurt using them,” Whitis advises. “Extreme caution should be taken whenever fire is involved.”

According to the National Council of Fireworks Safety, careless use of fireworks causes nearly 10,000 injuries a year in the United States; close to 2,000 of those injuries are eye-related involving children under the age of 15. The council advises that only people over the age of 12 should be allowed to handle sparklers of any kind.

“Celebrate our nation’s heritage safely on the Fourth of July,” says Whitis. “We want you to spend the holiday with your loved ones, not in the emergency room.”