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Provider Focus

JenScott2016Jen Scott, ARNP-C

Family Nurse Practitioner Jen Scott, ARNP-C, treats patients of all ages and has a special interest in cardiac care. 

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Latest News

Oh my Heart!

With a new little one, the tests, forms and information are abundant. Family Practice with Obstetrics Physician Dr. Shawn Richmond knows this all too well! One test that all of his little patients receive is a pulse oximetry to measure the amount of oxygen in the blood. Sounds big but it’s actually quite small. The test uses little sticky monitors (think of a band-aid), that are applied to a baby’s foot and hand. Don’t worry, this test is totally painless, but provides insight on their health, often before any signs and symptoms could be noticed. Pretty neat huh?

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Published Feb 23, 2017

Shake Those Hips!

When it comes to your body, aches and pains can really throw you for a loop! One common complaint is hip, knee and shoulder pain, at least in MHP Orthopaedic Surgeon Sreedhar Somisetty, MD’s, office! Some may think replacing those joints will fix all; however, Dr. Somisetty likes to remind patients that it’s not a race to the finish line and taking baby steps will get you on the road to recovery!

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Published Feb 16, 2017

Urinary Incontinence

Mahaska Health Partnership OB/GYN Educates on Urinary Incontinence

In his medical practice, Mahaska Health Partnership OB/GYN Specialist Dr. Jeffrey Fowler educates women on urinary incontinence.

“Adult women often suffer from symptoms of urinary incontinence which may happen without warning and can become worse as they become older,” Dr. Fowler said.

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, urinary incontinence, also known as loss of bladder control, is when urine leaks out before you can get to the bathroom.

“Millions of women lose a few drops of urine when they laugh or cough,” Dr. Fowler explained. “Others may feel a sudden urge to urinate and can’t control it. This is caused by problems with the muscles and nerves that help hold or pass urine.”

Urinary incontinence is more common in women and is often caused by pregnancy, childbirth and menopause. “When a woman is pregnant, the baby puts a great deal of pressure on the bladder and pelvic floor muscles,” Dr. Fowler described. “Childbirth can further weaken the muscles of the pelvis making it harder for women to control leaking of urine.”

There are many types of urinary incontinence, including stress incontinence which causes loss of urine with pressure such as when you cough, sneeze or during exercise. Urge incontinence is the sudden, intense urge to urinate while overflow incontinence results in frequent dribbles and an inability to empty your bladder.

Dr. Fowler says that regardless of the type of incontinence a person suffers from, there are treatments available. Urinary incontinence is not a disease but a symptom which can often be treated by modifying your behavior.

“After more serious medical conditions are ruled out, urinary incontinence can be treated through bladder training, fluid and diet management, physical therapy, medication and other interventions. In some cases, surgical procedures are needed to correct certain incontinence conditions,” Dr. Fowler explained.

“A constant need to use the bathroom can have a big impact on the choices a person makes. A person shouldn’t miss out on every day activities with friends and family over this treatable issue.”

Dr. Fowler is an OB/GYN Specialist practicing full time on the MHP campus in Oskaloosa. For an appointment, call 641.672.3360.