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  • Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet
    Dean Strawn Credits MHP Physical Therapy for Getting Him Back on His Feet

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  • After Hysterectomy, Tami O'Day Back to Work in 11 Days
    After Hysterectomy, Tami O'Day Back to Work in 11 Days

    With a household of eight to care for and a fulltime job, the last thing Tami O’Day of Oskaloosa was making time for was herself. Tami thought her m…

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  • Larry Spoelstra Gets to the Bottom of Health Concerns with Collaborative Care at MHP
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  • Janean Wedeking’s Family Gets a Little Bigger with MHP
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Provider Focus

FowlerHeadshotJeffrey Fowler, DO

Dr. Jeffrey Fowler is an OB/GYN at MHP who specializes in the obstetrical and gynecological care for women through every stage of life.

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Latest News & Events

22 September 2016
You’ve heard of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but what about prediabetes? When your blood sugar levels are high but not quite high enough to qualify as type 2 diabetes, you may be diagnosed with prediabetes. So what in the world does that mean? Well, according to MHP Registered Dietitian Lea Rice, it’s not a sentence for type 2 diabetes! In fact, this diagnosis is a great opportunity to look at your health and make adjustments before developing dia...
15 September 2016
Did you know that nearly 75% of all colon cancers can be prevented with healthy lifestyle choices? MHP General Surgeon Paul Riggs, MD, FACS, does know, which is why he is such an advocate for healthy colon habits! Screenings are an important tool in monitoring the health of your colon but there is a lot you can do between screenings to help this important organ do its best work! Your colon is responsible for helping you digest food and get valuab...

Risks of High Sodium Diet

Mahaska Health Partnership Explains Risks of High Sodium Diet

Sodium, or salt, is found in most foods that you eat, but Mahaska Health Partnership wants you to know that too much sodium in your diet can cause high blood pressure and other serious health problems.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) around 90% of Americans consume more sodium than recommended for a healthy diet. Most of the sodium in our diet comes from processed foods and food served in restaurants. Too much sodium can cause high blood pressure which often leads to heart disease and stroke. As a result, over 800,000 people die each year from these or other vascular disease.

“Sodium is already a part of processed foods and cannot be removed, but you should do your best to select lower sodium foods when possible,” said MHP Family Nurse Practitioner Chris Beaird. “The more fresh food you prepare yourself, the better control you have over your sodium intake.”

The CDC recommends limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg a day. People who are over 50, are of African American decent, have high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease should limit their sodium to 1,500 mg a day. The top sources of sodium include bread, cured meats, frozen prepared meals, pizza, poultry and other foods.

“If you are trying to limit the amount of sodium in your diet, you really need to closely review food labels and monitor your diet carefully,” explained Beaird. “Just because you cut back on using the salt shaker at mealtimes, doesn’t necessarily mean you’re lowering your sodium intake.”

Beaird went on to explain that while the words “salt” and sodium are used interchangeably, some salts contain no sodium at all. “Manufacturers add sodium to their products as a preservative. Restaurants add sodium to improve flavor,” said Beaird. “Another thing to be wary about is the brand of your food products. Different brands of the same food could have very different sodium levels.”

Eating a high sodium diet may not be a conscious choice, but there are things you can do to avoid getting high blood pressure or worse. Check the label on food products and choose options that are lower in sodium. Prepare more meals yourself instead of going to restaurants where sodium levels are notoriously high. Put down the saltshaker and pick up a healthier option such as a lemon wedge to flavor your food.

To learn more about how a high sodium diet may be negatively affecting your health, call 641.672.3360 to make an appointment with Family Nurse Practitioner Chris Beaird. Her hours are Monday and Tuesday from 8:30 am to 6:30 pm, Wednesday from 7:30 am to 4:30 pm and Friday from 7:30 am to 3:30 pm.