Your safety is our top priority.

Mahaska Health is and remains a safe place to seek care, and our expert care teams are ready to deliver exceptional care for you and your family. Our mission is focused on you with your health and safety as our top priority.

We have implemented carefully designed safety measures and precautions to keep our patients, our team, and our visitors safe. If you have questions, we encourage you to call before your visit to ensure you’re aware of any additional processes put in place for your visit.

COVID-19 Vaccine Information 1

When you visit Mahaska Health, you’ll see:

Please call us at 641.672.3360 to schedule an appointment.

Mahaska County COVID-19 Testing and Vaccine information, Resources and Update

Getting your COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to protect you and your loved ones from from severe illness and death from COVID-19 and the new coronavirus variants.

MAHASKA COUNTY (October 1st, 2021) – COVID-19 testing supplies are limited with supply distribution varying weekly. Mahaska Health would like to provide more information on available COVID-19 testing resources in the community.

Test Iowa has transitioned to free, home test kits that can be ordered at TestIowa.com. The kits are shipped directly to your home or can be picked up at Mahaska Health Door 1 or the Walk-In Clinic. The home saliva test kit has a turnaround time of 3-7 days and can be dropped off at a UPS drop-off site.

Additionally, local pharmacies offer COVID-19 testing, please call ahead or visit online for availability:

COVID-19 Vaccine Information & Resources

COVID-19 Vaccine Information 2

Hy-Vee Oskaloosa, Albia, Knoxville, Ottumwa, Pella, and other locations. Visit hy-vee.com/my-pharmacy/services/covid-19-testing

Walgreens free drive-thru COVID-19 testing for ages 3 and up. Visit walgreens.com/findcare/covid19/testing

For CVS please visit cvs.com/minuteclinic/covid-19-testing

COVID-19 vaccination is free, safe, and effective. It protects you, your family, and our community. Mahaska Health is accepting appointments for COVID-19 vaccines and those eligible for 3rd doses. Please call our clinic at 641-672-3360 for an appointment. Our Primary Care Clinics are available if you would like to schedule an appointment with your primary care provider or are a new patient.

We sincerely appreciate your patience and understanding at this time. Thank you again.

Getting your COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to protect you and your loved ones from from severe illness and death from COVID-19 and the new coronavirus variants.

MAHASKA COUNTY (October 1st, 2021) – COVID-19 testing supplies are limited with supply distribution varying weekly. Mahaska Health would like to provide more information on available COVID-19 testing resources in the community.

Test Iowa has transitioned to free, home test kits that can be ordered at TestIowa.com. The kits are shipped directly to your home or can be picked up at Mahaska Health Door 1 or the Walk-In Clinic. The home saliva test kit has a turnaround time of 3-7 days and can be dropped off at a UPS drop-off site.

Additionally, local pharmacies offer COVID-19 testing, please call ahead or visit online for availability:

Hy-Vee Oskaloosa, Albia, Knoxville, Ottumwa, Pella, and other locations. Visit hy-vee.com/my-pharmacy/services/covid-19-testing

Walgreens free drive-thru COVID-19 testing for ages 3 and up. Visit walgreens.com/findcare/covid19/testing

For CVS please visit cvs.com/minuteclinic/covid-19-testing

COVID-19 vaccination is free, safe, and effective. It protects you, your family, and our community. Mahaska Health is accepting appointments for COVID-19 vaccines and those eligible for 3rd doses. Please call our clinic at 641-672-3360 for an appointment. Our Primary Care Clinics are available if you would like to schedule an appointment with your primary care provider or are a new patient.

We sincerely appreciate your patience and understanding at this time. Thank you again.

COVID-19 Vaccine Availability Near You

Mahaska County Current Covid-19 Vaccine 1st and 2nd Dose Availability

Our Community Partners Mahaska Drug, Hy-Vee & Wal-Mart are also offering COVID-19 Vaccines here in Mahaska County:

Mahaska Health
1229 C Ave E, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-672-3100

Hy-Vee
110 S D St, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-673-0259
Walk in (8am-8pm) and online registration preferred

Mahaska Drug
205 N E St, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-673-0259

Wal-Mart
2203 A Ave W, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-673-3839
Walk in (8am-8pm) and online registration preferred.

CDC COVID-19 Vaccine Finder

COVID-19 Vaccine Availability Near You

Mahaska County Current Covid-19 Vaccine 1st and 2nd Dose Availability

We have four community based vaccination sites here in Mahaska County.

Mahaska Health
1229 C Ave E, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-672-3100

Hy-Vee
110 S D St, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-673-0259
Walk in (8am-8pm) and online registration preferred

Mahaska Drug
205 N E St, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-673-0259

Wal-Mart
2203 Avenue, A Ave W, Oskaloosa, IA 52577
641-673-3839
Walk in (8am-8pm) and online registration preferred.

CDC COVID-19 Vaccine Finder

COVID-19 Vaccine, Testing, Updates & Resources

1. Test Iowa has closed its testing sites, but at-home testing kits are available for patients

a. Based on availability, kits can be picked up at Door 1 or the Walk-In. Please call 641.672.3100 with questions, or to check availability.

b. Visit the Test Iowa website to order a kit and it will be delivered to your home

You can order a free at home kit online at testiowa.com. Kits are shipped directly to your home.

c. The patient would collect their own swab and drop the kit off at a UPS drop off site

d. Turnaround for results is 3-7 days

e. Patients can also visit the TestIowa.com website for a kit to be sent directly to their home or to view other options

2. Hy-Vee – Oskaloosa, Albia, Knoxville, Ottumwa, Pella, and other locations

a. Further information can be found on the Hy-Vee.com/covid website, call ahead to confirm availability

3. Walgreens or CVS – Des Moines or Ottumwa locations

a. Visit their websites for further details, call ahead to confirm availability

4. If you are traveling, refer to specific guidelines based on your destination. If “PCR” testing or “medically supervised’ testing is required, please refer to specific guidelines based on destination.

***Information is subject to change based on changes in supplies and recommendations from the CDC and/or IDPH.

Patients with any of the following symptoms will be directed to the Walk-In clinic at Door 4 for evaluation and possible testing:

· Fever or chills

· Cough

· Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

· Fatigue

· Muscle or body aches

· Headache

· New loss of taste or smell

· Sore throat

· Congestion or runny nose

· Nausea or vomiting

· Diarrhea

Symptoms that require evaluation in the Emergency Department:

· Trouble breathing

· Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

· New confusion

· Inability to wake or stay awake

· Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone

A COVID-19 vaccine might:

  • Prevent you from getting COVID-19 or from becoming seriously ill or dying of COVID-19
  • Prevent you from spreading the COVID-19 virus to others
  • Add to the number of people in the community who are protected from getting COVID-19
  • Prevent the COVID-19 virus from spreading and replicating, which allows it to mutate and possibly become more resistant to vaccines.

Data must show that a COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can give emergency use authorization or approval. The safety of COVID-19 vaccines is closely monitored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and FDA.

Vaccines with emergency use authorization by the FDA include:

  • Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine
  • Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for children ages 12 to 15
  • Janssen/Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine

All three COVID-19 vaccines provide strong protection against severe disease, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19.

The COVID-19 vaccines are among the most effective vaccines in history. They are as effective — if not more — than vaccines for polio, chicken pox, measles, and the flu.

In the U.S., the delta (B.1.617.2) variant is now the most common COVID-19 variant. It is nearly twice as contagious as earlier variants and might cause more severe illness.

While research suggests that COVID-19 vaccines are slightly less effective against the variants, the vaccines still appear to provide protection against severe COVID-19. For example:

  • Early research from the U.K. suggests that, after full vaccination, the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is 88% effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19 virus caused by the delta variant. The vaccine is 96% effective at preventing severe disease with the COVID-19 virus caused by the delta variant. The research also showed that the vaccine is 93% effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19 virus caused by the alpha variant.
  • Early research from Canada suggests that, after one dose, the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is 72% effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19 virus caused by the delta variant. One dose of the vaccine is also 96% effective at preventing severe disease with the COVID-19 virus caused by the delta variant.
  • The Janssen/Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine is 85% effective at preventing severe disease with the COVID-19 virus caused by the delta variant, according to data released by Johnson & Johnson.

(Source: Mayo Clinic)

September 22, 2021
Mahaska Health is committed to providing the COVID-19 vaccine to as many members of our communities as possible as quickly and safely as possible.

Who Needs an Additional COVID-19 Vaccine?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has amended the emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine to allow for use of a single booster dose, to be administered at least six months after completion of the primary series in:

  • Individuals 65 years of age and older;
  • Individuals 18 through 64 years of age at high risk of severe COVID-19; and
  • Individuals 18 through 64 years of age whose frequent institutional or occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2 puts them at high risk of serious complications of COVID-19 including severe COVID-19.
  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

Patients should speak with their healthcare provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

What’s the difference between a booster dose and an additional dose?

Sometimes people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised do not build enough (or any) protection when they first get a vaccination. When this happens, getting another dose of the vaccine can sometimes help them build more protection against the disease. This appears to be the case for some immunocompromised people and COVID-19 vaccines. CDC recommends moderately to severely immunocompromised people consider receiving an additional (third) dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) at least 28 days after the completion of the initial 2-dose mRNA COVID-19 vaccine series.

In contrast, a “booster dose” refers to another dose of a vaccine that is given to someone who built enough protection after vaccination, but then that protection decreased over time (this is called waning immunity).

Only Certain Populations Initially Vaccinated With the Pfizer -BioNTech Vaccine Can Get a Booster Shot at This Time.

People aged 65 years and older and adults 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions should get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. The risk of severe illness from COVID-19 increases with age, and can also increase for adults of any age with underlying medical conditions.

Residents aged 18 years and older of long-term care settings should get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Because residents in long-term care settings live closely together in group settings and are often older adults with underlying medical conditions, they are at increased risk of infection and severe illness from COVID-19.

People aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions may get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine based on their individual benefits and risks. Adults aged 18–49 years who have underlying medical conditions are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. However, that risk is likely not as high as it would be for adults aged 50 years and older who have underlying medical conditions. People aged 18–49 years who have underlying medical conditions may get a booster shot after considering their individual risks and benefits.

People aged 18–64 years at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may get a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine based on their individual benefits and risks. Adults aged 18–64 years who work or reside in certain settings (e.g., health care, schools, correctional facilities, homeless shelters) may be at increased risk of being exposed to COVID-19, which could be spreading where they work or reside. Since that risk can vary across settings and based on how much COVID-19 is spreading in a community, people aged 18–64 years who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission because of occupational or institutional setting may get a booster shot after considering their individual risks and benefits. This recommendation may change in the future as more data become available.

Occupations at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure and transmission include front line essential workers and health care workers as previously detailed by the CDC*

  • First responders (healthcare workers, firefighters, police, congregate care staff)
  • Education staff (teachers, support staff, daycare workers)
  • Food and agriculture workers
  • Manufacturing workers
  • Corrections workers
  • U.S. Postal Service workers
  • Public transit workers
  • Grocery store workers

*List could be updated in the future

August 23, 2021 

Mahaska Health is committed to providing the COVID-19 vaccine to as many members of our communities as possible as quickly and safely as possible.

Who Needs an Additional COVID-19 Vaccine?

Currently, CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose. This includes people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

Patients should speak with their healthcare provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

The CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose.

What’s the difference between a booster dose and an additional dose?

Sometimes people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised do not build enough (or any) protection when they first get a vaccination. When this happens, getting another dose of the vaccine can sometimes help them build more protection against the disease. This appears to be the case for some immunocompromised people and COVID-19 vaccines. CDC recommends moderately to severely immunocompromised people consider receiving an additional (third) dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna) at least 28 days after the completion of the initial 2-dose mRNA COVID-19 vaccine series.

In contrast, a “booster dose” refers to another dose of a vaccine that is given to someone who built enough protection after vaccination, but then that protection decreased over time (this is called waning immunity). HHS has developed a plan to begin offering COVID-19 booster shots to people this fall. Implementation of the plan is subject to FDA’s authorization and ACIP’s recommendation: and therefore at this time booster shots for the general population have yet to be approved by the CDC.

August 23, 2021 

Mahaska Health is committed to providing the COVID-19 vaccine to as many members of our communities as possible as quickly and safely as possible.

Who Needs an Additional COVID-19 Vaccine?

Currently, CDC is recommending that moderately to severely immunocompromised people receive an additional dose. This includes people who have:

  • Been receiving active cancer treatment for tumors or cancers of the blood
  • Received an organ transplant and are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Received a stem cell transplant within the last 2 years or are taking medicine to suppress the immune system
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (such as DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids or other drugs that may suppress your immune response

Patients should speak with their healthcare provider about their medical condition, and whether getting an additional dose is appropriate for them.

 

It is not yet known when the vaccines will be available to the general public. Like all Iowa health systems, we are working closely with the CDC and state health departments charged with vaccine distribution in our state. Mahaska Health is following all state and federal recommendations for COVID-19 vaccine distribution. The Iowa Department of Public Health, based on recommendations put forward by the Iowa Diseases Advisory Council (IDAC) has provided due to the current and short term projections for vaccine allocation for Iowa, IDAC recommendations for Phase 1B focus on individuals who are age 75 and over* (*IDPH issued updated guidance on 01/21/2021 for Phase 1B. Beginning February 1, persons aged 65 years and over OR, populations vulnerable to high risk of exposure or severity of illness will be eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.) as well as other high-risk populations. This includes Iowans who are most vulnerable to exposure to COVID-19 or high-risk for illness. We will keep you posted when we are able to begin vaccinating Phase 1B priority populations. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the State of Iowa determine who gets the vaccine. The vaccines will be made available in phases. The CDC and the State of Iowa will provide guidance on who will belong to each phase of vaccinations.

Due to nationwide vaccine shortage and limited vaccine availability, the federal government and the state of Iowa have established priority groups that are being given the vaccine first due to their risk of exposure to COVID-19. We expect production of the vaccine to increase in 2021, when there will eventually be enough supply of the vaccine for everyone who would like to receive it.

As of January 15, based on limited vaccine supply, Polk County announced that they are still currently in Phase 1A, which includes Healthcare Personnel and Long-term Care Facility Residents and Staff.

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) has indicated it wants to get everyone in the state vaccinated as soon as possible, but it will take time. You can also sign up for MahaskaAlert email updates here.

For more information on vaccine availability, return to this page regularly. It will be updated as more information becomes available.

You can also visit the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) COVID-19 vaccination information. People who don’t have internet access can get information about the COVID-19 vaccines by calling IDPH at 2-1-1.

Where to Find More Info

COVID-19 Vaccine Information 3

Because it’s possible to get reinfected and COVID-19 can cause severe medical complications, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people who have already had COVID-19 get a COVID-19 vaccine.Getting COVID-19 might offer some natural protection or immunity from reinfection with the COVID-19 virus. But it’s not clear how long this protection lasts.

If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Mahaska Health is following national and state guidelines regarding the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines.

Due to the limited vaccine, the federal government and the state of Iowa have established priority groups that are being given the vaccine first due to their risk of exposure to COVID-19. We expect production of the vaccine to increase in 2021, when there will eventually be enough supply of the vaccine for everyone who would like to receive it.

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) has indicated it wants to get everyone in the state vaccinated as soon as possible, but it will take time.

Vaccine eligibility is determined by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) when vaccine supply is limited. ACIP presents their recommendations to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Because early supplies of the COVID-19 vaccine are limited, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued recommendations for who should be considered eligible for vaccination first. Based on those recommendations and the number of doses they are allocated, state and county public health departments receive federal guidance to determine a more specific prioritization schedule for their residents. Allocation plans can vary from state to state and the speed at which eligible individuals are vaccinated depends on the number of doses available. Learn more about how the CDC determines the eligibility recommendations for the vaccine:

  • Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), with input from the Infectious Disease Advisory Council (IDAC), will provide more recommendations for who should get vaccine next. This guidance is to help reduce health inequities from geography, poverty, and other social determinants.

Mahaska County Public Health will share information about when vaccine will be given to more groups within the general public once that information is available from federal and state partners.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the State of Iowa determine who gets the vaccine. The vaccines will be made available in phases. People who need the vaccine sooner will be included in earlier phases. The CDC and the State of Iowa will provide guidance on who will belong to each phase of vaccinations. Mahaska Health will continue to update this section with more information on availability once more guidance regarding the phased distribution is available.

As soon as we have more information to proceed, we will partner with public health to contact people who are eligible for the vaccine regarding next steps.

COVID-19 Vaccine Information 3

Vaccination sites will provide space for social distancing and will require that face masks be worn. We ask that only the patient attend the appointment whenever possible. We recognize that some patients will require assistance and exceptions will be allowed in those cases. Patients will be asked to wait in their vehicles until the time of their appointment to further support social distancing and a streamlined process.

Patients will be required to remain at the vaccination site to be monitored for 15 to 30 minutes after receiving the vaccine to monitor for any adverse reactions. In the rare event of a reaction, medically trained staff will be readily available onsite to manage these reactions.

Due to the limited vaccine, the federal government and the state of Iowa have established priority groups that are being given the vaccine first due to their risk of exposure to COVID-19. We expect production of the vaccine to increase in 2021, when there will eventually be enough supply of the vaccine for everyone who would like to receive it.

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) has indicated it wants to get everyone in the state vaccinated as soon as possible, but it will take time. You can also sign up for MahaskaAlert email updates here. We also post updates on COVID-19 vaccinations as well.

You can stay up to date by visiting the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) website. If you do not have internet access, you can call IDPH with any general COVID-19 questions by calling 2-1-1.

For more information on vaccine availability, return to this page regularly. It will be updated as more information becomes available.

You can also visit the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) COVID-19 vaccination information. People who don’t have internet access can get information about the COVID-19 vaccines by calling IDPH at 2-1-1.

Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, people may be advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine even if they have been sick with COVID-19 before. At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person. Some early evidence suggests natural immunity may not last very long. Experts won’t know how long immunity produced by vaccination lasts until more data is available on how well it works.

Yes. While experts learn more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide under real-life conditions, it will be important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to us to help stop this pandemic, like covering your mouth and nose with a mask, washing hands often, and staying at least 6 feet away from others. Experts need to understand more about the protection that COVID-19 vaccines provide before deciding to change recommendations on steps everyone should take to slow the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.

If you are not feeling well, it is recommended that you wait until you are feeling better to get the vaccine. For any questions about the COVID-19 vaccine and how it relates to your medical condition or history, contact your primary care provider.

Mahaska Health Primary Care & Family Medicine

641.672.3360

Additional COVID-19 Vaccine Updates & Resources

Where to Find More Info

COVID-19 Vaccine Information 6

How can I keep myself safe and healthy right now?

The CDC recommends the following:

  • Wash your hands often and correctly or use alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • Getting your COVID-19 vaccine is the best way to protect you and your loved ones from from severe illness and death from COVID-19 and the new coronavirus variants. Learn more about vaccinations.
  • Practice social distancing
  • Wear a face mask that covers your mouth and nose
  • Stay home if you aren’t feeling well
  • Cover coughs and sneezes
  • Get a flu shot and stay up to date on your vaccinations
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, daily